RainWise WindLog Wind Data Logger

The WindLog is a compact, inexpensive wind data logger for autonomous collection of wind speed and direction data.

Features

  • 2 MB memory stores over a years worth of wind data at a 10 min interval
  • Operates on 3 AA Alkaline or Lithium batteries
  • Logs average speed, wind gust and average direction
List Price $385.00
Your Price $346.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days
RainWise
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
RainWise WindLog Wind Data Logger804-1005 WindLog wind data logger
$346.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days
RainWise WindLog Wind Data Logger
804-1005
WindLog wind data logger
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$346.50
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
RainWise Mono Mount 811-1008 Mono mount
$49.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
RainWise Tripod Mount 811-1004 Tripod mount, 3 ft.
$59.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Mono mount
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$49.00
Tripod mount, 3 ft.
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$59.00

The WindLog is a compact, inexpensive wind data logger for autonomous collection of wind speed and direction data. Data can be downloaded from the WindLog using a 15-foot USB cable and the no-cost Windows-based WindLogger software (WindSoft), which uses a SQLite database to track and record wind information.

The logging interval can be set from once a minute to once an hour. The USB cable can be left connected to the WindLog, allowing real-time viewing of the wind data on a computer. By combining both logged and real-time data, WindLog can be used both online and offline. WindSoft can generate statistics, graphs and reports. It can also export CSV files for use with Microsoft Excel or any other application that supports CSV files.

Battery life for the logger will depend upon the environment and logging rates. Typical battery life is 6-9 months. When connected to a computer the WindLog will use the USB port power to run. This further extends the life of the batteries.

The Mini-Aervane wind sensor is equipped with low friction race bearings. This reduces the threshold to approximately one mile per hour. The wind direction sensor has a 16-point resolution. Logged direction readings are averaged readings.

A support mast is included with the WindLog. This mast can be used with the Rainwise Mono Mount or tripod. The mast may also be attached to a support structure using U-Bolts or lag screws.

Questions & Answers
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