Solinst Model 102 P4 Probe Water Level Meters

The Solinst Model 102 Water Level Meter uses a 4mm (0.157") probe that is constructed of stainless steel and weighs 0.35 ounces. The probe size is ideal for accessing narrow diameters.

Features

  • Accurate, precise laser markings
  • Narrow 4mm x 38mm probe weighing 0.35 oz (10g)
  • Ideal for accessing narrow diameters
List Price $394.00
Your Price $374.30
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Solinst Model 102 P4 Probe Water Level Meters112266 Model 102 water level meter with P4 probe & English increments, 100'
$374.30
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Model 102 P4 Probe Water Level Meters 112278 Model 102 water level meter with P4 probe & metric increments, 30m
$374.30
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Model 102 P4 Probe Water Level Meters 112270 Model 102 water level meter with P4 probe & English increments, 200'
$450.30
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Model 102 P4 Probe Water Level Meters 112279 Model 102 water level meter with P4 probe & metric increments, 60m
$450.30
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Model 102 P4 Probe Water Level Meters 112271 Model 102 water level meter with P4 probe & English increments, 300'
$526.30
In Stock
Solinst Model 102 P4 Probe Water Level Meters 112280 Model 102 water level meter with P4 probe & metric increments, 100m
$526.30
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Solinst Small Carry Case 102974 Small carry case
$63.32
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

The Solinst Model 102 P4 Probe Water Level Meter is designed to measure groundwater levels in small diameter tubes and piezometers. A choice of two small diameter probe designs are attached to a narrow coaxial cable. The cable has a heavy-duty polyethylene jacket and stainless steel coaxial conductors for durability and strength. Permanent markings are precisely laser etched on the cable every 1/100 ft. or each millimeter.

A standard 9 volt battery, housed in an easy-access battery drawer, powers the Water Level Meter. When the probe enters water, a light and clearly audible buzzer are activated. The water level is then determined by taking a reading directly from the cable at the top of the well casing or borehole. A sensitivity control allows the buzzer to be turned off while in cascading water and ensures a clear signal in both high and low conductivity conditions.

  • (1) Model 102 P4 Probe Water Level Meter
  • (1) Tape Guide
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