Turner Designs Cyclops-7F Submersible Sensors

The Turner Designs Cyclops-7F submersible sensor is a high performance and compact fluorometer designed for integration into any platform that supplies power and data logging.

Features

  • Interfaces easily with most data collection platforms using 0-5 VDC output
  • Very low power consumption allows for extended remote deployments
  • Interfaces with DataBank Handheld Data Logger and Cyclops-7 Logger
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Turner Designs Cyclops-7F Submersible Sensors

Overview
The Turner Designs Cyclops-7F submersible fluorometer sensors are designed for integration into remote data collection and telemetry platforms. The sensors offer a unique combination of performance and size, making them very attractive for freshwater, coastal, and oceanographic environments. Cyclops-7F sensors are configured and factory scaled for the specific analysis of turbidity, chlorophyll, phycocyanin, phycoerythrin, rhodamine dye, fluorescein dye, CDOM, crude oil, optical brighteners, PTSA dye, or tryptophan.

Durable
The Cyclops-7F sensor features a locking sleeve Impulse connector with cable options available from 2 feet to 50 meters. The rugged stainless steel construction is designed to withstand most environmental conditions. Common applications include turbidity dredge monitoring, algal bloom notification, and dye tracer studies.

Questions & Answers
When should I use a Shade Cap?
Turner Designs recommends use of the shade cap, as it provides a fixed distance for sample measurement and minimizes affects from ambient light. The Shade Cap also offers protection for the optics and prevents damage from deploying, recovering, or transporting the instrument, in fast-flowing environments, and/or from bottoming out in shallow environments.
What is the difference between the C-FLUOR and Cyclops-7F fluorometers?
C-FLUOR sensors come standard with a titanium housing and factory calibration. The depth rating is also improved to 2000m. C-FLUOR sensors have a single gain setting, while the Cyclops-7F has a wider linear range with three gain settings.
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Turner Designs Cyclops-7F Submersible Sensors
2110-000-T
Cyclops-7F turbidity sensor, stainless steel housing
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Turner Designs Cyclops-7F Submersible Sensors
2110-000-C
Cyclops-7F chlorophyll sensor, stainless steel housing
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Turner Designs Cyclops-7F Submersible Sensors
2110-000-R
Cyclops-7F rhodamine WT sensor, stainless steel housing
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Turner Designs Cyclops-7F Submersible Sensors
2110-000-F
Cyclops-7F fluorescein sensor, stainless steel housing
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Turner Designs Cyclops-7F Submersible Sensors
2110-000-P
Cyclops-7F blue-green algae (phycocyanin) sensor, stainless steel housing
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Turner Designs Cyclops-7F Submersible Sensors
2110-000-U
Cyclops-7F colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) sensor, stainless steel housing
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Turner Designs Cyclops-7F Submersible Sensors
2110-000-G
Cyclops-7F refined fuels sensor, stainless steel housing
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