SeaView Systems SVS-603 Wave Sensor

The SVS-603 Wave Sensor is a highly accurate MEMS-based sensor that reports heading, wave height, wave period and wave direction via RS-232 or logs to its on-board data logger.

Features

  • Plug-and-play interface with full line of NexSens CB-Series data buoys
  • Sophisticated onboard electronics provide near-real-time wave statistics
  • On-board data logger capable of logging as much as ten years of wave data
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SeaView Systems SVS-603 Wave SensorSVS-603 Inertial wave sensor for wave height, period & direction
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NexSens SVS-603 Wave Sensor SVS-603-UW Inertial wave sensor for wave height, period & direction. Housed in waterproof enclosure with UW plug connector for CB-Series data buoys
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The SVS-603 Wave Sensor is a highly accurate MEMS-based sensor that reports heading, wave height, wave period and wave direction via RS-232 or logs to its on-board data logger. The SVS-603 represents a new generation in accuracy and completeness for wave sensing electronics whose features include:

  • Very low power consumption; fits the smallest power budget
  • Very small footprint; sold packaged or as bare PCB
  • MEMS sensors account for 3-D motion, rotation and compass heading in all dimensions to cover nine degrees of freedom
  • Sophisticated onboard electronics provide near-real-time wave statistics
  • On-board temperature compensation for highest accuracy
  • On-board data logger capable of logging as much as ten years of wave data
  • Easy configuration to match your exact sensing rate and output requirements
  • Readily interfaced with transmitter using NMEA or other configurable data output
  • Outputs “First-5” Fourier wave coefficients for NOAA compliant data logging/transmission

The SVS-603 can be used to replace existing sensors, to upgrade existing buoys, or to add wave sensing capabilities to even the most compact buoys. Among the wave data that are available as outputs from the sensor are:

  • Heading in degrees
  • Significant wave height in meters (Hs)
  • Wave period in seconds
  • Wave direction in degrees from north
  • Maximum wave height (Hmax)
  • Wave period at Hmax
  • Full wave spectrum (raw or processed)
  • Custom outputs as required
Other outputs or data manipulations can be incorporated via firmware updates or through calculations on the available data stream.

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Output Formats

  • NMEA
  • First-5 wave coefficients
  • User definable
  • Full wave spectrum

Accuracy Metrics

  • H± 0.5cm
  • Period <1%
  • Heading Angle within ± 4 degrees*

Available Ports and Slots

  • RS232
  • Adjustable baud rate (2.4-115.2 kbps)
  • Micro-USB
  • Micro-SD card

Dimensions

  • 53.5mm length
  • 68mm width
  • 23mm height

Input Power

  • 150mW@12V
  • 136mW@5V
  • 5-30VDC

* Dependent on orbital buoy motion.

Questions & Answers
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