SonTek FlowTracker2 Handheld ADV

The SonTek FlowTracker2 (FT2) handheld Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is a wading discharge measurement instrument that is handheld, portable and precise.

Features

  • Improved ADV acoustics: faster pinging, lower noise and better standard error
  • Embedded GPS for geo-referencing with automatic or manual fixes
  • Set up and save templates—no need to re-enter data every time you visit a site
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Overview
The SonTek FlowTracker2 (FT2) handheld Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is a wading discharge measurement instrument that is handheld, portable and precise. 2-D data in the horizontal plane (2D/3D option available) allows the most comprehensive QC and understanding about flow conditions. User calibration is never required.

Benefits

  • Embedded GPS for georeferencing with automatic or manual fixes
  • Improved ADV acoustics: faster pinging, lower noise and better standard error
  • Battery life icon on the screen at all times. Pre-load the spare cartridge and replace, even mid-measurement, with no data loss
  • Detachable probe with extension cables to customize cable length up to 10m
  • Probes and handhelds are interchangeable—flexibility within agency teams and when sending equipment for service
  • Set up and save templates—no need to re-enter data every time you visit a site
  • Bluetooth or direct USB interface with PC
  • Audio prompts

 

Handheld Specifications

Input Battery Voltage 8 - 12 VDC
Power Supply 8 X AA Batteries
Battery Life 11 hours continuous use, typical settings1
Power Consumption 1 W (Average)
GPS: H. Position Accuracy Up to 2.5 m (8.2 ft) nominal2
GPS: Frequency L1 (1.575 MHz)
SBAS compensation (WAAS, EGNOS, MSAS, GAGAN)
LCD Resolution 320 X 240 TFT Transmissive
Bluetooth Class 2, Range = 10 m (33 ft) nominal
USB Micro USB, IP-67
Battery Power to Probe 8 - 12 VDC
Data Transfer RS-232
Data Storage 16 GB. Up to 10k discharge measurements
Up to 10 million velocity samples
Operating Temperature Alkaline Batteries: -20° to 45°C (-4°F to 113°F)
NiMH: -20° to 50°C (-4°F to 122°F)
Storage Temperature -30° to 70° C (-22° F to 158° F)3
Waterproof Rating IP-67 (1m submersible)
Handheld Dimensions (L)10.4 cm (4.1 in)
(W) 6.4 cm (2.5 in)
(H) 23.7cm (9.3 in)
Weight in Air 0.75 kg (1.65 lbs)
Weight in Water -0.25 kg (-0.55 lbs)

 

Probe Specifications

Velocity Range ±0.001 to 4.0 m/s (0.003 to 13 ft/s)
Velocity Resolution 0.0001 m/s (0.0003 ft/s)
Velocity Accuracy +/1% of measured velocity, +/- 0.25cm/s
Acoustic Frequency 10.0 MHz
Sampling Volume Location 10 cm (3.93 in) from the center transducer
Minimum Depth 0.02 m (0.79 in)
Depth Measurement Range 0 to 10m (0 to 32.81ft)
Depth Measurement Resolution 0.001m (0.003ft)
Depth Sensor Accuracy +/- 0.1% of FS (temperature compensated over full operating range)
  +/- 0.05% Static (steady-state at 25°C)
  Additionally compensated for real-time
water velocity, temperature, salinity, and altitude.
Temperature Sensor Resolution: 0.01° C, Accuracy: 0.1° C
Tilt Sensor Resolution: 0.001°, Accuracy: 1.0° 
Communication Protocol RS-232
Operating/Storage Temperature -20° C to 50° C (-4° F to 122° F)
Probe Head Dimensions (L)13.3 cm (5.22 in)
(W) 6.1 cm (2.39 in)
(H) 2.3 cm (0.90 in)
Standard Cable Length 1.5 m (4.92 ft)
Weight in Air 0.90 kg (1.98 lbs)
Weight in Water 0.30 kg (0.66 lbs)
  • (1) FlowTracker2 handheld display unit
  • (1) USB interface cable
  • (1) Spare battery cartridge
  • (8) AA alkaline batteries
  • (1) Shipping case
Questions & Answers
What is the purpose of the optional depth sensor?
During a discharge measurement, a typical user will read the water depth from wading rod markings. With a the integrated depth sensor, water depth can be measured automatically, reducing human error in the field and providing increased accuracy.
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