YOUNG ResponseONE Ultrasonic Anemometer

The YOUNG ResponseONE Ultrasonic Anemometer accurately measures wind speed and wind direction without moving parts.

Features

  • Includes an integrated compass to enable mobile applications
  • Serial output formats include SDI-12, NMEA, and ASCII text
  • Wiring connections are made in a convenient weather-proof junction box
Your Price $996.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
YOUNG
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YOUNG ResponseONE Ultrasonic Anemometer91000 ResponseONE ultrasonic anemometer, white
$996.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
YOUNG ResponseONE Ultrasonic Anemometer 91000B ResponseONE ultrasonic anemometer, black
$996.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
RM Young Cables 18446 Sensor cable, 5 conductor shielded, 22 AWG, per ft.
$0.90
Drop ships from manufacturer
YOUNG Portable Tripod 18940 Portable tripod
$496.00
Drop ships from manufacturer

The YOUNG ResponseONE Ultrasonic Anemometer accurately measures wind speed and wind direction without moving parts. The IP66 rated construction includes an integrated compass to enable mobile applications. Standard digital serial output formats provided include SDI-12, NMEA, and ASCII text. Output may be continuously provided or, to conserve power, polled output may be used. RS-232 or RS-485 serial format options enable direct integration with YOUNG displays, marine NMEA systems, data loggers or other compatible serial devices.

The ResponseONE features durable, corrosion-resistant construction and installs on readily available 1 inch (IPS) pipe. Wiring connections are made in a convenient weather-proof junction box. Special connectors and cables are not required.

Wind Speed:
Range: 0-70 m/s (156 mph)
Resolution: 0.01 m/s
Accuracy:
+/-2% or 0.3 m/s (0-30 m/s)
+/- 3% (30-70 m/s)

Wind Direction:
Azimuth Range: 0-360 degrees
Resolution: 0.1 degree
Accuracy: +/- 2 degrees

Electronic Compass:
Range: 0-360 degrees
Resolution: 1 degree
Accuracy: +/- 1.4 degrees

Serial Output (selectable):
Interface: RS-232, RS-485/422, SDI-12
Formats: NMEA, SDI-12, ASCII (polled or continuous)
Baud Rates: 1200, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400

Power:
Voltage:
10-30 VDC

General:
Protection Class:  IP66
EMC Compliance:  FCC Class A digital device, IEC Standard 61326-1
Dimensions:  22.5 cm high x 13.5 cm wide
Weight:   0.36 kg (0.8 lb)
Shipping Weight:  1.27 kg (2.8 lb)
Operating Temperature:  -40 to +60 C
Removable Bird Spikes:  Included

Questions & Answers
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