YOUNG ResponseONE Weather Transmitter

The YOUNG ResponseONE Weather Transmitter measures wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, humidity, and temperature in one compact instrument.

Features

  • Measures four key meteorological variables with integrated compass
  • Serial output formats include SDI-12, NMEA, and ASCII text
  • Wiring connections are made in a convenient weather-proof junction box
Your Price $1,996.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
YOUNG
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YOUNG ResponseONE Weather Transmitter92000 ResponseONE weather transmitter
$1,996.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
YOUNG ResponseONE Weather Transmitter
92000
ResponseONE weather transmitter
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$1,996.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
RM Young Cables 18660 Sensor cable, 8 conductor shielded, 22 AWG, per ft.
$1.94
Drop ships from manufacturer
YOUNG Portable Tripod 18940 Portable tripod
$506.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
RM Young Cables
18660
Sensor cable, 8 conductor shielded, 22 AWG, per ft.
Drop ships from manufacturer
$1.94
Portable tripod
Drop ships from manufacturer
$506.00

The YOUNG ResponseONE Weather Transmitter measures four key meteorological variables with one compact instrument. It is ideal for many weather monitoring applications requiring accurate, and reliable measurements. Ultrasonic wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, humidity and temperature sensors are carefully integrated into an enclosure optimized for durability, airflow and mitigation of solar radiation effects. An integrated compass helps enable mobile applications. A variety of useful serial output formats are provided including SDI-12, NMEA, and ASCII text. Output may be continuously provided or, to conserve power, polled output may be used. RS-232 or RS-485 serial format options enable direct integration with YOUNG displays, marine NMEA systems, data loggers or other compatible serial devices. An easy-to-use Windows setup program is provided with each sensor. The program allows the user to customize the device settings such as sampling rates and communication parameters.

The ResponseONE features durable, corrosion-resistant construction and installs on readily available 1 inch (IPS) pipe. Wiring connections are made in a convenient weather-proof junction box. Special connectors and cables are not required.

Wind Speed:
Range:
0–70 m/s (156mph)
Resolution: 0.01 m/s
Accuracy:
±2% or 0.3 m/s (0–30m/s)
±3% (30 – 70 m/s)

Wind Direction:
Azimuth Range:
0-360 degrees
Resolution: 0.1 degree
Accuracy: ±2 degrees

Temperature:
Range:
-40 to +60°C
Resolution: 0.1°C
Accuracy: ±0.5°C

Relative Humidity:
Range: 0–100%
Resolution: 1%
Accuracy: ±2%

Atmospheric Pressure:
Range: 500–1100 hPa
Resolution: 0.1 hPa
Accuracy: ±0.5 hPa

Electronic Compass:
Range:
0–360 degrees
Resolution: 1 degree
Accuracy: ±1.4 degrees

Serial Output (selectable):
Interface: RS-232, RS-485/422, SDI-12
Formats: NMEA, SDI-12, ASCII (polled or continuous)
Baud Rates: 1200, 4800, 9600, 19200 and 38400

Power
Voltage
: 10–30 VDC
Current: 7 mA @ 12 VDC typical, 80 mA max

General
Protection Class
: IP65
EMC Compliance: FCC Class A digital device, IEC Standard 61326-1
Dimensions: 30 cm high x 13.5 cm wide
Weight: 0.7 kg (1.5lb)
Shipping Weight: 1.6 kg (3.5lb)
Operating Temperature: -40 to +60°C
Removable Bird Spikes: Included

Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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