YSI 2003 Polarographic Dissolved Oxygen Sensor

The YSI 2003 polarographic dissolved oxygen sensor provides reliable DO readings and includes the 5908 yellow 1.25 mil PE membrane kit.

Features

  • Dissolved oxygen sensor for the YSI Pro Series handheld meters
  • Easily inserts into the probe module and cable assembly
  • Compatible with YSI 5906, 5908, or 5909 screw-on cap membranes
List Price $229.00
Your Price $217.55
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Overview
The YSI 2003 Polarographic Dissolved Oxygen Sensor is designed for use with the Pro20, Pro20i, Pro1020, Pro2030, and Pro Plus instruments; cables must be ordered separately. The YSI 2003 can be used on 60520 (DO), 6052030 (DO/conductivity), 6051020 (DO/ISE), and 605790 Quatro (DO/conductivity/ISE/ISE) cables.

*The YSI 2003 comes with six membrane caps and a bottle of solution.

  • 1-year warranty
  • (1) YSI 2003 DO module
  • (1) 5908 cap membrane kit
  • (1) Instruction sheet
  • (1) Hex wrench
  • (1) Set screw
Questions & Answers
How does a Polarographic DO sensor work?
In a polarographic sensor, the cathode is gold and the anode is silver. The system is completed by a circuit in the instrument that applies a constant voltage of 0.8 volts to the probe, which polarizes the two electrodes. The sensor operates by detecting a change in this current caused by the variable pressure of oxygen while the potential is held constant at 0.8 V. The more oxygen passing through the membrane and being reduced at the cathode, the greater the signal increases.
Why is the Polarographic sensor warranted for 1 year while the Galvanic is only warranted to 6 months.
Galvanic sensors continually consume the anode, even when the instrument is off. The consumption of the polarographic sensor stops when the instrument is turned off, giving it a longer sensor life.
Is this sensor approved by the EPA?
Yes, the proven technology of the steady-state sensor is approved by the US EPA for compliance monitoring and reporting.
How often should the dissolved oxygen sensor be calibrated?
The DO readings should be verified before each use, and a YSI recommends performing a 1-point calibration before each use to maintain accurate readings. You can follow the instructions in the calibration guide for dissolved oxygen sensors. 
What is the main difference between the yellow vs blue caps for the YSI 2003 polarographic sensor?
The YSI 2003 polarographic DO sensor can accomodate either a blue or yellow cap. The yellow, 1.25 mil PE cap has an 8 second response time and requires a flow rate of 6 inches/second over the sensor membrane. The blue 2.0 mil PE cap has a 17 second response time and requires a flow rate of 3 inches/second. 
How often should the membrane cap be replaced on electrochemical dissolved oxygen sensors?
YSI recommends replacing the membrane cap every 2-8 weeks.
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YSI 2003 Polarographic Dissolved Oxygen Sensor
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2003 polarographic DO sensor with yellow 1.25 mil PE membrane kit, Pro Series
Your Price $217.55
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