605203

YSI 2003 Polarographic Dissolved Oxygen Sensor

YSI 2003 Polarographic Dissolved Oxygen Sensor

Description

The YSI 2003 polarographic dissolved oxygen sensor provides reliable DO readings and includes the 5908 yellow 1.25 mil PE membrane kit.

Features

  • Dissolved oxygen sensor for the YSI Pro Series handheld meters
  • Easily inserts into the probe module and cable assembly
  • Compatible with YSI 5906, 5908, or 5909 screw-on cap membranes
List Price
$185.00
Your Price
$175.75
In Stock

Shipping Information
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Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The YSI 2003 is designed for use with the Pro20, Pro20i, Pro1020, Pro2030, and Pro Plus instruments; cables must be ordered separately. It can be used on 60520 (DO), 6052030 (DO/conductivity), 6051020 (DO/ISE), and 605790 Quatro (DO/conductivity/ISE/ISE) cables.

The YSI 2003 comes with six membrane caps and bottle of solution.

Notable Specifications:
  • 1-year warranty
What's Included:
  • (1) YSI 2003 DO module
  • (1) 5908 cap membrane kit
  • (1) Instruction sheet
  • (1) Hex wrench
  • (1) Set screw
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YSI 2003 Polarographic Dissolved Oxygen Sensor 605203 2003 polarographic DO sensor with yellow 1.25 mil PE membrane kit, Pro Series
$175.75
In Stock
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YSI 5908 DO Cap Membrane Kit 605306 5908 PE yellow 1.25 mil cap membrane kit, 550A, DO200, 559 & 2003 polarographic sensors
$57.00
In Stock
Additional Product Information:

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
How does a Polarographic DO sensor work?
In a polarographic sensor, the cathode is gold and the anode is silver. The system is completed by a circuit in the instrument that applies a constant voltage of 0.8 volts to the probe, which polarizes the two electrodes. The sensor operates by detecting a change in this current caused by the variable pressure of oxygen while the potential is held constant at 0.8 V. The more oxygen passing through the membrane and being reduced at the cathode, the greater the signal increases.
Why is the Polarographic sensor warranted for 1 year while the Galvanic is only warranted to 6 months.
Galvanic sensors continually consume the anode, even when the instrument is off. The consumption of the polarographic sensor stops when the instrument is turned off, giving it a longer sensor life.
Is this sensor approved by the EPA?
Yes, the proven technology of the steady-state sensor is approved by the US EPA for compliance monitoring and reporting.

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