YSI ProDSS Total Algae Sensor

The YSI ProDSS total algae sensor is a digital smart sensor for helping monitor, mitigate, and manage the impacts of harmful algal blooms.

Features

  • Dual channel sensor
  • Measures and outputs both chlorophyll & blue-green algae
  • Options for ug/L and RFU outputs
List Price $3,200.00
Your Price $3,040.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI
Government and Educational PricingGovernment and Educational Pricing
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
Free Ground ShippingFree Ground Shipping
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI ProDSS Total Algae Sensor626210 ProDSS freshwater total algae sensor (chlorophyll & phycocyanin)
$3,040.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI ProDSS Total Algae Sensor 626211 ProDSS saltwater total algae sensor (chlorophyll & phycoerythrin)
$3,040.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Bright Dyes Rhodamine WT Dye 106023-01P FWT 25 Rhodamine WT dye, 2.5% active ingredient, 1 pint
$29.95
In Stock
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Solar and Wind-Powered, Algae Tracking Boat Trialed in Florida

Time is of the essence when it comes to tracking algal blooms, and people everywhere are looking for solutions. In Florida, scientists from Florida Atlantic University Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute (HBOI) recently trialed a solar-powered, algae-tracking sail boat developed by Navocean , Inc. Dr. Jordon Beckler of Florida Atlantic University (FAU) directs HBOI's Geochemistry and Geochemical Sensing Lab and spoke to EM about the trials and the boat. "This boat is so amazing when you see it in action," remarks Dr. Beckler. "Navocean originally contacted me a few years back about a demonstration when I was over at my previous institution in West Florida, and we brainstormed some scenarios for employing the boat for harmful algae bloom monitoring.

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Utah’s Canyonlands Research Center: A Great Study Location for Climate Effects on Ecosystem Processes, Community Dynamics and More

Canyonlands Research Center (CRC) is situated at The Nature Conservancy’s Dugout Ranch , over 5,200 private acres of research study area. One of CRC’s primary roles is to facilitate research and monitoring work of university and federal researchers. CRC is located adjacent to Canyonlands National Park , which extends over more than 337,000 acres of public land. CRC also partners with many organizations, including the Bureau of Land Management, USFS, NPS, USGS, Utah State University, and the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources to identify the most pressing research needs in this region.

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