Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer

The Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer is designed without a tubing barb for water level measurements.

Features

  • Affordable method to monitor shallow groundwater and soil vapor
  • Attach to inexpensive 3/4" (20 mm) NPT steel drive pipe
  • Can be used for permanent well points or short-term monitoring applications
Starting At $73.00
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Overview
The Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer uses a high quality stainless steel piezometer tip, 3/4" NPT pipe for drive extensions and LDPE or Teflon sample tubing, if desired. Combine these with an inexpensive Slide Hammer for a complete system.

Design
The Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer is designed without a tubing barb for water level measurements, which saves money and provides better access for Water Level Meters.

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Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer
102841
Model 615N drive-point piezometer, 6"
$73.00
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Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometers
102842
Model 615N drive-point piezometer, 12"
$104.00
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