SonTek CastAway-CTD

The CastAway-CTD is a lightweight, easy to use instrument designed for quick and accurate conductivity, temperature, and depth profiles.

Features

  • Can be used for sensor verification, speed of sound profiles, thermocline profiling, and more
  • Sampling rate and sensor response of 5 Hz with 1m per second free fall design
  • Designed for CTD profiling down to 100m
Your Price $6,240.00
In Stock
SonTek
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
SonTek CastAway-CTDCA-CTD CastAway-CTD conductivity, temperature & depth instrument
$6,240.00
In Stock

The CastAway-CTD is a small, rugged and technically advanced CTD designed for profiling to depths of up to 100m. The system incorporates modern technical features which allow it to achieve a 5 Hz response time, fine spatial resolution and high accuracy. It uses a six electrode flow-through conductivity cell with zero external field coupled with a rapid response thermistor to attain high measurement accuracies. The instrument is simple to deploy, does not require a pump and is hydrodynamically designed to free fall rate of 1 m/s.

The integrated real-time data display screen, internal GPS sensor and automated wireless data transfer are unique features that simplify data collection.

  • Salinity Accuracy: 0.1 PSU
  • Temperature Accuracy: 0.05°C
  • Small size
  • Integrated GPS position
  • Real-time display screen
  • Wireless data transfer
  • 5 Hz sampling rate

Each CastAway-CTD cast is referenced with both time and location using its built-in GPS receiver. Latitude and longitude are acquired both before and after each profile. Plots of conductivity, temperature, salinity and sound speed versus depth can be viewed immediately on the CastAway's integrated color LCD screen in the field.  Raw data can be easily downloaded via Bluetooth to a Windows computer for detailed analysis and /or export at any time.

  • (1) CastAway-CTD with polyurethane jacket
  • (3) Magnetic stylus pens
  • (1) Bluetooth adapter
  • (2) Carabiners
  • (1) 15m casting line
  • (4) AA batteries
  • (1) Cleaning brush
  • (1) USB flash drive with CastAway Windows software and documentation
  • (1) Quick Start Guide
  • (1) Hard plastic storage/shipping case
Questions & Answers
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