Van Essen Micro-Diver Water Level Loggers

The Van Essen Micro-Diver is designed to measure water pressure and temperature autonomously after being programmed to suit user needs.

Features

  • Compact size: 18mm diameter x 88mm length
  • Stores 48,000 records of time, pressure and temperature
  • Pre-programmed and user defined pumping tests
$892.00
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Van Essen Micro-Diver Water Level Loggers

Overview
The Van Essen Micro-Diver is the smallest Diver capable of accurately recording groundwater levels and temperature. The Micro-Diver is specifically designed for monitoring wells or drive-points too small to accommodate larger dataloggers. In addition to its compact size, the Micro-Diver’s memory capacity can store up to 48,000 measurements per parameter - almost one measurement every ten minutes for an entire year.

Compact Pressure Sensor
The Van Essen Micro-Diver is the smallest Diver with a diameter of 18 mm and a stainless steel (316 L) casing. The Micro-Diver is suitable for pipes with a diameter of at least 20 mm (0.787 in). The Diver consists of a pressure sensor, a temperature sensor and memory for storing measurements and a battery. The Diver is an autonomous datalogger that can be programmed by the user. The Diver has a completely sealed enclosure. The communication between Divers and Laptops/field devices is based on optical communication.

 

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Van Essen Micro-Diver Water Level Loggers
DI601
Micro-Diver water level & temperature logger, 10m range
$892.00
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Van Essen Micro-Diver Water Level Loggers
DI602
Micro-Diver water level & temperature logger, 20m range
$892.00
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Van Essen Micro-Diver Water Level Loggers
DI605
Micro-Diver water level & temperature logger, 50m range
$892.00
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Van Essen Micro-Diver Water Level Loggers
DI610
Micro-Diver water level & temperature logger, 100m range
$892.00
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