YSI EXO NitraLED UV Nitrate Sensor

Utilizing state-of-the-art UV LED technology, EXO NitraLED is an optical nitrate sensor designed for long-term, low-drift monitoring in freshwater applications.

Features

  • Available at a fraction of the cost of other lamp-based nitrate sensors
  • Built-in corrections for natural organic matter (NOM) and turbidity
  • Designed for use with EXO1, EXO2, EXO3, or EXO2s water quality sondes
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI EXO NitraLED UV Nitrate Sensor608090 EXO NitraLED UV nitrate sensor kit, includes alignment ring & wiper brush
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Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI EXO NitraLED UV Nitrate Sensor 608040 EXO NitraLED UV nitrate sensor
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Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI EXO NitraLED UV Nitrate Sensor
608090
EXO NitraLED UV nitrate sensor kit, includes alignment ring & wiper brush
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Request Quote
YSI EXO NitraLED UV Nitrate Sensor
608040
EXO NitraLED UV nitrate sensor
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Request Quote
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI EXO2/EXO3 Alignment Ring Kit 608080 EXO2/EXO3 alignment ring kit
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Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI EXO NitraLED Wiper Brush 608085 EXO NitraLED wiper brush
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Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI NitraLED Nitrate Calibration Standards 608072 NitraLED nitrate calibration standard, 5 mg/L, 946mL
$95.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI NitraLED Nitrate Calibration Standards 608073 NitraLED nitrate calibration standard, 10 mg/L, 946mL
$95.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
EXO2/EXO3 alignment ring kit
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Request Quote
EXO NitraLED wiper brush
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Request Quote
NitraLED nitrate calibration standard, 5 mg/L, 946mL
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$95.00
YSI NitraLED Nitrate Calibration Standards
608073
NitraLED nitrate calibration standard, 10 mg/L, 946mL
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$95.00
Accuracy

± 0.1 mg/L–N or 5% of reading, w.i.g. (within 2°C)
± 0.4 mg/L–N or 5% of reading, w.i.g. (full temp range)

Depth Rating 250 m
Drift / Stability

≤ 0.2 mg/L–N

Equipment used with EXO™
Light Source UV LED (x2)
Lower Detection Limit

0.005 mg/L–N

Measurement Range

0-10 mg/L–N

Medium

Fresh water

Nominal Wavelengths 235 nm, 275 nm
Operating Temperature 5-35°C
Pathlength 10 mm
Precision

≤ 2% Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Response Time T95 < 30 seconds
Sensor Optical, absorbance
Storage Temperature -20-80 °C
Warranty

2 years

Questions & Answers
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