YSI EXO NitraLED UV Nitrate Sensor

Utilizing state-of-the-art UV LED technology, EXO NitraLED is an optical nitrate sensor designed for long-term, low-drift monitoring in freshwater applications.

Features

  • Available at a fraction of the cost of other lamp-based nitrate sensors
  • Built-in corrections for natural organic matter (NOM) and turbidity
  • Designed for use with EXO1, EXO2, EXO3, or EXO2s water quality sondes
Your Price Call
Stock Check Availability  
Accuracy

± 0.1 mg/L–N or 5% of reading, w.i.g. (within 2°C)
± 0.4 mg/L–N or 5% of reading, w.i.g. (full temp range)

Depth Rating 250 m
Drift / Stability

≤ 0.2 mg/L–N

Equipment used with EXO™
Light Source UV LED (x2)
Lower Detection Limit

0.005 mg/L–N

Measurement Range

0-10 mg/L–N

Medium

Fresh water

Nominal Wavelengths 235 nm, 275 nm
Operating Temperature 5-35°C
Pathlength 10 mm
Precision

≤ 2% Coefficient of Variation (CV)

Response Time T95 < 30 seconds
Sensor Optical, absorbance
Storage Temperature -20-80 °C
Warranty

2 years

Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

Select Options

  Products 0 Item Selected
Image
Part #
Description
Price
Stock
Quantity
YSI EXO NitraLED UV Nitrate Sensor
608090
EXO NitraLED UV nitrate sensor kit, includes alignment ring & wiper brush
Request Quote
Check Availability  
YSI EXO NitraLED UV Nitrate Sensor
608040
EXO NitraLED UV nitrate sensor
Request Quote
Check Availability  
  Accessories 0 Item Selected
Notice: At least 1 product is not available to purchase online
×
Multiple Products

have been added to your cart

There are items in your cart.

Cart Subtotal: $xxx.xx

Go to Checkout

In The News

Sewage an Unseen and Ignored Threat to Coral Reefs and Human Health

It’s an open, dirty secret that the ocean is used as the ultimate sewage solution. Each year trillions of gallons of untreated waste are sent to the ocean due to a widespread lack of sanitation technology or infrastructure that needs updating as cities and populations grow. As the impact of untreated sewage on the ocean becomes clearer, attention to the problem and strategies for dealing with it have not kept up. “This is a massive problem and it’s been largely ignored,” said Stephanie Wear, senior scientist and strategy advisor for The Nature Conservancy. Wear has turned her attention to raising the alarm about the effects of sewage on coral reefs, which often loses airtime to other pressing issues like climate change and overfishing.

Read More

Coastal Restoration in Rhode Island

Anyone who has spent a significant amount of time in nature can likely relate to feeling connected and defensive toward protecting the environment. Heather Kinney, a coastal restoration scientist with The Nature Conservancy in Rhode Island, knows this feeling well, having felt a deep connection to nature her entire life. “I have always had a deep love for nature and the environment, particularly being out on the water and being drawn to the ocean, as cliché as that sounds,” says Kinney. Being so close to nature her entire life led Kinney to pursue a career in conservation and restoration. “You want to protect what you love, and I think that once I fell in love with it- it was something that I wanted to be able to pursue professionally,” she explains.

Read More

Not So Quiet Polar Night: Arctic Creatures Found to be Active During Dark Part of the Year

Most people need little more than a comfortable pillow, a blanket, and a dark room to drift off into a multi-hour snooze. Many researchers assumed that once plunged into darkness for about half the year during the polar night, most polar creatures would do the same: fall asleep and take a big nap for as long as the darkness lasted. But Jon Cohen, associate professor of marine sciences, school of marine science and policy, in the College of Earth, Ocean, and the Environment at the University of Delaware, wondered if that was true. Despite the technical challenges of monitoring biota in very low light conditions, Cohen and his team were determined to find out if krill, copepods, and other creatures were dozing off in the dark or seeking out prey, light, and each other.

Read More